27 Jul 27

If you feel like you’re wasting too many hours at the docks, you’re not alone. DAT surveyed 257 carriers and owner-operators, and 63% of them told us that the average amount of time they spend waiting for a shipper to get them loaded or unloaded is more than 3 hours. The vast majority of the carriers surveyed said that detention is one of the 5 biggest problems their companies face.

Like the old saying goes, if the wheels aren’t turning, you aren’t earning. So, what can the industry do to fix the problem?

how long are drivers detained
The graph above shows responses from 257 carriers surveyed

For one, carriers and brokers can work together to hold shippers accountable. DAT also surveyed 50 brokers about how detention times affect their businesses, and the results showed a lack of communication between brokers and carriers. When brokers were asked how often the carriers they work with say that they’re detained, the most popular answer was 1-10% of the time. 

DRIVER DETENTION

See the complete results of DAT's survey about driver detention

When the broker is able to collect from a shipper, the carrier is twice as likely to get paid detention fees. Two-thirds of the brokers said that they only pay detention when the shipper covers that expense. 

But detention fees are usually only $30 to $50 an hour. That doesn't help much, if getting detained means you’ve missed your next load. 

Others have also suggested putting together a website that lets carriers rate and review shippers. Each shipper would then get a score, which a carrier could look up before accepting a load. Or the carrier could take it into consideration when negotiating a rate.

"It’s a matter of fairness," said Don Thornton, Senior VP at DAT Solutions. "Many shippers and receivers are lax about their dock operations, but it's the carriers and drivers who are forced to pay for that inefficiency."

If the industry doesn’t work to find a solution, the government is probably going to step in. Last month, the Department of Transportation announced that it’s studying driver detention

How do we fix this? Got an idea to share? 

Comments (27) -

Albert Kohl
Albert Kohl

Very simple solution. Customer orders, customer unloads. After a single hour of waiting, shipper or receiver is to pay the driver $50 in increments of 15 minutes. But a minimum of one hour to start with. Not the company, the driver.

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Carlos martinez
Carlos martinez

Let carriers charge the same as shippers do they charge $250 if you show up late for your appointment but will not pay for not unloading fast enough. Also brokers are a bunch of liars because half of the time they don't want to pay detention even if you inform them 1 hour after appointment that's why I voluntarily closed my authority down to much headache  

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Kerry Mullins
Kerry Mullins

Detention needs to be paid and it needs to be punitive. There's absolutely no reason for any truck to be detained over 2 hours in a dock, and when they are $100 an hour FINE for doing so.

We're expected to be on time, when we're late we're FINED, shippers and receivers also need to feel the brunt of their workforce screwing around collecting money not earned.

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Luis Hernandez
Luis Hernandez

I think the root of the problem is the loading dock not being punctual on either man power or having the load ready or having excess. The solution would seem to be to contact the broker or carrier whenever the load is ready to be loaded instead of having lines of trucks sitting waiting to get loaded. Also, there are dozens of brokers who state they will not pay out detention and there isn't much carriers can do when it comes down to it. I have seen shippers/receivers listed on google that have in their reviews people who have commented on how good or bad the company is when it comes to shipping/receiving so maybe a website with all of that information would help.

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Mike Potratz
Mike Potratz

Government should take away the ability of carrier to pay drivers by the mile.  Government already defines what is "on duty" which very few drivers get paid for.  If this happened drivers would have to be paid for loading and unloading time since it is already defined by law as "on duty".  Carriers would ALL have the same problem and the market would find the appropriate price level.  
Problem solved.  no new complex regulations no shipper rules etc.  

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Market will pay you 15 bucks hr

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Kerry Mullins
Kerry Mullins

If you own your truck and are working with brokers, and they state they will not pay detention, you state that you don't want the load. Period.

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About 2 weeks ago I loaded at A.Duie Pyle in Westfield,MA with Nestle water and one pallet in middle of trl was shifted and one pallet was wrong item.When I went to SAMs club in Worcester,MA the receiver would take the shifted one but not the wrong item so he loaded me back with both pallets and from 1:00 am until 11:30 am I was waiting there for someone to take a decision about those 2 pallets.At 11:30 am CH Robinson call me to trow it or donate it some place at my time or expense.In top of that I lost $1000.00 loads and I was reimbursed with $150.00 for layover flat rate.More over I lost the rest of the week connecting loads.
Maybe somebody will tell me how can I stay in business or survive with today low pay rate and bills increase?
Maybe at $150.00 flat rate per hour after 2 hours at the arrival at their facility with or without appointment during open business hours will be only fair price because we don't have just 11hr to drive and God know what surprises we might get in every trip from DOT HASLE to traffic construction or not be able to find a spot to park from 10:00pm until 7:00am.

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Don't haul for ch Robison I can't believe there still in. Buisness I thought everyone knew they was crooks

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Well.....
I will stop hauling for CHR any advice on good honest brokers?
At this point I am considering dropping my own authority and lease with a loco company.....probably I will make same profit with not so much headache.

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I haven't hauled for Cheater Robinson for about 4 years. Gotta love their agents who promise you "If you take this crappy load, your next load will be high paying and much lighter" and so on, with the chain of lies.

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That is correct. We have the same problems almost every week. The brokers pay us little for the loads and when we are waiting for loading or unloading for a long hours and we get canceled our next loads. Then broker pays us layover charges $150 waiting for whole day or sometime they tells us sorry customer did not approved for detention.

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If your an owner operator the loads are your decision. My self personally I do not take CH ROBBISON loads. I give shipper  a 2 hour window to get loaded if not I cancel load and move on. It works for me and u would be surprised how many shippers will have you loaded fast when you tell them your leaving.

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That is great idea.

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WE HATE CROOKED BROKERS!

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The biggest problem is the lumper system. There is absolutely no reason to have lumpers in the first place. The receiver orders the product THEY SHOULD unload it. Seal in tact. Unload the truck and sign the paperwork. DONE. Now we have the lumper. They unload and sort the product and break it down on OUR time. They hold the truck while doing the work for the receiver. After they decide to finish then they want your money, " which is billed back to the receiver or shipper anyway", then after it is counted and stacked for the receiver, IF there is a shortage or overage it doesn't matter anyway because it is not the drivers fault. It falls on the shipper and receiver. SEAL IN TACT, imaging that. This is where the problem lies. Ergo on the shipping side as well.

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scott campbell
scott campbell

the brokers are liares you call them they say keep up with time they will pay you, bu yo never see it j b hunt is one of the worst go by there rules n you still never see it. t q l is another liare , the only way to solve the problem is to leave on 2 hrs. not get the loaded.another problem brokers lying about the weight of a load tell you its 30 thousand n ge to pick I up n be44 thousand..
,

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James Matthews
James Matthews

Simple fix  When the truck arrives the clock starts  50.00 per hour when it leaves.it stops  no grace period.   Watch how efficient shippers and receivers would become.

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It won't matter how much you charge. Look at what they charge in lumper fees, 100 to 1000 dollars. Money is a write off to big companies. Make it mandatory for companies to have the trucks out within 2 hours and this will stop. Costco does it as well as others, so why not all. Stop the lumpers and you stop the wait. There are federal laws already in place to stop this but not one agency will uphold the law.

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Every other organization in this country stands up to protest their cause and the government promotes it for the false sake of equality.  The only organization or industry that does not stand up for it's rights is the trucking industry as a whole.  The only thing that will stop this abuse is a united revolt and refusal to run unless it is immediately fixed.  It would take one hot day to turn it around.  Put a time clock in every shipper and receiver and drivers will punch their time in and the companies cannot dispute it.  By law they have to pay.  You don't stand up and voice your opinion while at the facilities holding you up, they know their is no recourse against them.  Sheep to the slaughter!

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The problem here is the middleman called the brokers. Don't know how many times I have heard them refer too the shipper as a customer like you the owners operators are not. Currently waiting in Atlanta with 2 days added to my delivery time because a shipper refuse too load a 15 minute late truck due too another one of there places taking 5 1/2 hours too unload. Thi is costing me  a lot of money and home time and will most likely not see an additional dime for my time and equipment storage space  for their product.

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We Will stand Up We Will ComeTogethe

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Leander Richmond
Leander Richmond

The most simple thing to do is to create a "Covenants" page as we have done. It outlines many things that we expect like, Detention. We also do not sigh or agree to pre-stated deductions like $50 fine for not PPW within 24 hours. Really???? There are more but my response to this question is simply to make the agreements up front. There should always be a full understanding of all expectations before hand. W hauled a load a week ago for a Broker that stated on their contract that they do not pay detention. We said that we would leave after 2 hours if not loaded. We were loaded in one hour.

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I got held up for 3 days on a load that was supposed to unload the same day.the broker wanted to pay 150 a day layover fee.I charged them 2500. Plus the original load amount, and wouldn't release the load until they wired money to my account.

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Some shippers/recvrs will not let us to use bathroom even if you stay there for couple hours. Getting paied for detention, we can dream about it.

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Guys please don’t get soft when brokers refuse to pay for detention. You are your company and you have your policy just like any other company. Charge $65 per hour anything over 3 hours is $90 per hour. Don’t fall for the “my customer will not pay detention” from brokers. Don’t care.... you are working with the broker and not their customer. Don’t deliver the load until you are paid. Don’t let them scare you with “calling police......you holding the load hostage.......filing a insurance claim...” legally the load is yours. As long as it sits in on your trailer, it’s yours.

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SAJVIR SINGH
SAJVIR SINGH

I'M AGREE. WE WORK HARD AND BROKER KEEPS ALL THE MONEY WITCH IS BELONGS TO US FOR DETENTION.

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